Here at Nuala Cagney Dental we pride ourselves on providing a quality service to all our customers.
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GENERAL ADVICE  

  

Caring for Childs Teeth & and Gums

 

At Nuala Cagney Dental Practice, we will help you and your child to have healthy mouths and an understanding of the best care for your child’s teeth. Healthy teeth are important for speech, to chew properly ensuring correct nutrition and for confidence interacting with other children.

Prevention and Advice

Decay

Decay occurs when plaque bacteria ferment and break down dietary carbohydrates or sugars to release an acid. This acid effectively dissolves the tooth structure causing cavities.

How to prevent decay in children:

  • Keep sugars in the diet to a minimum
  • Brush twice daily
  • Have fissure sealants applied on adult molar teeth
  • Use a fluoride toothpaste in children over 2 years
  • Have regular dental check-ups and always discuss any concerns with your dentist.

At Nuala Cagney Dental Practice, we will help you and your child to have healthy mouths and an understanding of the best care for your child’s teeth. Healthy teeth are important for speech, to chew properly ensuring correct nutrition and for confidence interacting with other children.

Prevention and Advice

Decay

Decay occurs when plaque bacteria ferment and break down dietary carbohydrates or sugars to release an acid. This acid effectively dissolves the tooth structure causing cavities.

How to prevent decay in children:

  • Keep sugars in the diet to a minimum
  • Brush twice daily
  • Have fissure sealants applied on adult molar teeth
  • Use a fluoride toothpaste in children over 2 years
  • Have regular dental check-ups and always discuss any concerns with your dentist.
Healthy Diet

Infants

Decay can start soon after the baby teeth erupt in the mouth. This decay in infants results from long-term exposure to liquids containing sugars. Among these liquids are milk, formula, fruit juice and sweetened drinks.

To avoid decay in infants:

  • Don’t encourage on demand feeding and never allow a child to fall asleep with a bottle of milk/formula/juice
  • Don’t dip a soother in sugar/honey/sweetened drinks
  • When a baby starts feeding, encourage savoury foods and with any ready-prepared foods or processed foods, always read the label for any added sugars.

Children

Carefully monitor your child’s food and drinks for any added sugars. The frequency of sugary foods is more important than the amount. Replace sugary snacks with alternatives such as carrot sticks, apples, nuts, cheese, crackers, popcorn (popcorn is usually safe from the age of 5). Fruits contain natural sugars but these sugars are less damaging than added sugars. So fruit in moderation should be part of their healthy diet. Milk or hard cheese after a meal will help neutralise sugars or acids.

Adults

How Can I Help Prevent Cavities?

  • Brush at least twice a day and floss daily to remove plaque from between teeth and below the gumline
  • Have regular dental checkups. Preventive care can help stop problems from occurring and keep minor problems from becoming major ones
  • Eat a well-balanced diet that limits starchy or sugary foods. When you do eat these foods, try to eat them with your meal instead of as a snack to minimize the number of times that your teeth are exposed to acid
  • Use dental products that contain fluoride, including toothpaste
  • Make sure that your children’s drinking water is fluoridated. If your water supply does not contain fluoride, your dentist or pediatrician may prescribe daily fluoride supplements

Healthy tooth Early decay Advanced decay

Eat Right

Eat Right

Brushing

Brush your child’s teeth until 5-6 years of age and teach them how to brush well. Lead by example and let you child see you brushing your own teeth. This teaches them that oral hygiene is part of the daily routine. At 7 years of age, a child is usually old enough to brush well by themselves.

Infants                                                                    brush teeth

  • Brush twice daily
  • Use a pea-sized amount of toothpaste from 2 years up
  • Use a soft toothbrush, brushing in small circles, covering all surfaces of the teeth

Children

  • Help them with brushing until 7 years of age
  • Stand behind the child holding their chin upwards
  • Brush after breakfast and before bed
  • Have a regular tooth-brushing routine
  • Use a pea-sized amount of toothpaste
  • Encourage your child to spit out the toothpaste rather than rinsing
  • Supervise brushing to avoid toothpaste being swallowed
  • Change your child’s toothbrush every 3 months or when the bristles get splayed
  • Praise them for good brushing.

Adults

Fluoride Toothpaste

Fluoride is needed every day to prevent tooth decay. For most, using toothpaste with the appropriate level of fluoride twice a day will provide adequate protection. Studies have shown that brushing twice a day using fluoride toothpaste reduces the risk of tooth decay much more than brushing only once a day.

Its best if you only spit out the excess toothpaste rather than rinse out with water. Additional fluoride protection may be needed if the risk of tooth decay is higher, for example if you have dry mouth or have frequent intake of sugary food and drinks. Your dentist may advise additional fluoride in the form of fluoride mouthrinses, high fluoride toothpaste or professionally applied fluoride varnish.

Toothbrush

It is important that you remove plaque build up, daily and thoroughly from all tooth surfaces by brushing and flossing. If plaque is not removed each day, it can harden to form calculus (tartar). Once calculus has formed, it will have to be removed by your dental professional. Calculus traps more plaque making it more difficult to keep teeth clean.

Dental floss

Dental floss removes plaque from between teeth where it is hard to reach with your toothbrush. If flossing proves difficult, try interdental brushes. Ask your dental professional to advise what is best suited for you.

Mouthrinses

Mouthrinses can provide extra fluoride but do not replace the need to brush and floss your teeth daily. To maximise the effect of mouthrinses they should be used at a different time to toothbrushing. Mouthrinses are not recommended for children under 6 years of age.

 

toothbrush

Teething

Symptoms

  • Slightly raised temperature, but not a fever (a fever is a temperature of 38⁰C or above)
  • Rash on their face
  • Reddened gums – their gums may be swollen or tender
  • Excessive dribbling – this may cause a rash on the chin
  • Poor appetite – your baby may be reluctant to eat as result of sore gums
  • Chewing or biting – your baby may chew on their toys or fingers
  • Restlessness and Irritability – the pain of teething may cause them to cry
  • Disturbed sleep

Management

  • Teething gels
  • Teething rings (never cool a teething ring in the freezer or tie a teething ring around your baby’s neck)
  • Paracetamol / Ibuprofen – carefully follow the recommended dosage
  • Cool drinks to soothe the gums
  • Distraction – playing with your baby distracts from the pain of teething
  • Wipe dribble frequently from your baby’s chin

teething

Trauma

Trauma to children’s teeth is common, usually due to playing/cycling/fighting/falls or other sports. In children with adult teeth, a mouthguard should be worn during contact sports. If you think your child’s tooth could be damaged, you should seek advice immediately from a dentist.

If an adult tooth is knocked out completely –

  1. Keep calm! Make sure it is an adult tooth. Baby teeth should not be put back in.
  2. Find the tooth and pick it up by the crown (the whiter part). Avoid touching the root.
  3. If the tooth is dirty, wash it briefly (10 seconds) using milk, saline solution or cold running water.
  4. Replant the tooth using the teeth at either side of the gap as a guide to the position. Once positioned, the person should bite on a handkerchief to hold the tooth in place until the dentist splints it in place.
  5. If the tooth cannot be replanted immediately, it can be carried either inside the injured person’s mouth between the teeth and the side of the cheek, or in milk.
  6. Continuing Dental Care
  7. It is important to encourage a positive attitude to visiting the dentist. Before the visit, talk to your child about what to expect and build excitement as well as understanding about the visit.

At Nuala Cagney Dental Practice we try to make the experience for children as positive and fun as possible in a friendly environment. We welcome children of all ages and we always take a gentle approach, keeping the visits as easy as possible for them.

Having a positive experience as a child can have a lifelong impact on the person’s dental health.

Tips for Children
  • Encourage savoury snacks
  • Use a straw for any sugary drinks/smoothies/juices
  • To reward your child, give them stickers/comics/pens or paints instead of treats such as chocolate or cakes.
  • Use a gold star chart for good brushing/healthy eating

Step by Step Directions For Brushing Your Teeth

The following step by step advice will lead you in the right direction:

  • Use about a pea-sized amount of toothpaste. Use the appropriate type of toothpaste for your needs. Kids should be given a pea-sized smear unless otherwise directed.
  • Start in the same place each time, it doesn’t matter where. It is just important to set up a routine so you are less likely to leave anywhere out
  • Tilt the brush towards the gum at a 45 degree angle. This allows the bristles to clean just under the gum, where plaque tends to gather
  • Brush in small circular movements, moving the brush-head slowly along. Ensure several of these movements at each tooth.
  • Concentrate on one corner of your mouth at a time, splitting the mouth into four
  • In each corner; brush the inside, outside and biting surfaces of each tooth
  • To reach the inside surfaces of the front teeth, you will need to hold the brush vertically.
  • Then make the same small, circular motions to clean these areas
  • Gently brush the tongue to help keep it clean and your breath fresh
  • DO NOT rinse out our mouth after brushing with toothpaste. This will only rinse away the beneficial ingredients such as fluoride.  SPIT but DON’T RINSE!
  • Do you floss before or after brushing? – Best to floss first as this will remove debris and plaque from the interdental areas. Clearing this space then allows the beneficial ingredients of toothpaste to get in and work their magic.

Electric Toothbrush Use

The best way to use your electric toothbrush will depend, to an extent, on the type and model that you are using. So always read the instructions. Regardless of the type of toothbrush you use for your oral health, how you use the toothbrush is what matters. The following are general tips on how to brush your teeth safely, using an electric toothbrush.

  • Do not exert too much pressure when holding it against the tooth surfaces. As with a manual toothbrush, excess pressure can lead to damage of the enamel and gums
  • Gently move along to clean every surface. Have a system to ensure you don’t miss anywhere. For example, spend 30 seconds at each quarter of the mouth. Some of the top rated models will even remind you of when to move!
  • Make sure you reach the right the way to the back and the tongue-side of all the teeth
  • Electric toothbrushes do not provide a short-cut to thorough cleaning! You still need two minutes twice-a-day.
Gum Disease and Tooth Decay: The Two Big threats from Neglecting your Teeth

Gum disease and tooth decay are the two main dental problems, especially if you are neglecting your teeth. Gum disease is the leading cause of tooth loss, where the gums are gradually stripped away from the teeth.  Gum disease is a preventable condition, but if left untreated it can lead to the loss of the bone that holds the teeth in place.  Plaque-bacteria causes gum disease.

Good oral hygiene to clear plaque, along with regular professional cleanings, is key to preventing the disease.  It can be hard for people to know they have gum disease until the problem has become severe.  Therefore regular dental check-ups are vital.

Tooth decay is the destruction of teeth caused by plaque acids that are released after we eat/drink something.  When decay breaks into the tooth it will only get bigger until treated. Tooth decay can lead to severe toothache. Treatment may be a filling, a crown or an inlay. If the decay gets into the center of the tooth where the nerve lies, the tooth will need root canal treatment or extraction.

Reducing the risks of dental decay involves:

  • Good oral hygiene to remove plaque and provide fluoride into the mouth, together with a tooth-kind diet with limited snacking between meals and regular check-ups.
  • You will find a lot more advice and tips in our sections on gum disease and tooth decay prevention.
Bleaching Advice

Home Bleaching

INFORMED CONSENT FOR COLGATE MAX WHITE PROFESSIONAL TEETH

WHITENING TREATMENT

Background: We provide this information to give you insight into teeth whitening.  Your cooperation and understanding of this material is necessary as we strive to achieve the best results for you.

Procedure:  Professional tooth whitening is a procedure designed to lighten the color of your teeth using a hydrogen peroxide mixture.  It produces maximum whitening results in the shortest possible time with minimum sensitivity.  During the procedure, the whitening gel will be applied to your mouth guard as per your dentist’s instructions.  Your mouthguard is then worn for 30 – 60 minutes. Before and after the first application, the shade of your teeth will be assessed and recorded.

Risks: All forms of health treatment, including tooth whitening, have some risks and limitations.  Complications that can occur in professional tooth whitening are infrequent and are usually minor in nature.

Tooth Sensitivity: During the whitening process some patients may experience tooth sensitivity.  This is normal and generally mild if your teeth are not normally sensitive.

If your teeth are normally sensitive, please inform us before treatment.  Please let us know if you experience any discomfort during or after the procedure so we are able to minimize your discomfort. A mild analgesic will usually be effective in eliminating any discomfort.

Gum and soft tissue irritation: Whitening may cause inflammation of your gums, lips or cheek margins.  This is generally the result of the whitening gel coming into contact with these tissues.  Protective materials are placed in the mouth to prevent this, but despite our best efforts, it can still rarely occur. If any irritation does occur, it is generally short in duration and is very mild.  Rinsing with warm salt water can relieve it.

Existing restorations:  White fillings; porcelain or composite restorations, crowns or veneers may not whiten at all or evenly with your natural teeth during this procedure. Please discuss this with your dentist prior to beginning treatment.

Treatment Responsibilities:  If you do not understand something communicated to you during consultation, or in any printed material given to you before or after the procedure, please feel free to ask.

Expectations: Significant whitening can be achieved in many cases, but there is no absolute way to predict how light your teeth will get.  Please understand that teeth with multiple colorations, bands, splotches or spots due to tetracycline staining or fluorosis do not whiten as well and may appear more spotted after treatment. These effects are generally short in duration. Teeth whitening  is not recommended for pregnant or lactating women, children under 14 years of age or any persons having known peroxides allergies.

Alternate Treatment Options: If you have questions regarding other treatment alternatives please ask the dentist. Alternatives such as chairside teeth whitening are available.

Whitening

  • Follow instructions from your dental professional.
  • If you are a smoker, do not smoke for 48 hours.
  • Stay away from highly coloured foods (red sauce, blueberries, etc.) and beverages (coffee, tea, etc.) for 48 hours.
  • Mild sensitivity to hot or cold liquids may occur.  This usually passes within 1-2 days.
  • If sensitivity is severe or persists, contact your dental office.
  • If you experience gum sensitivity do not brush the afflicted area while brushing your teeth.
  • Immediate whitening results can be quite dramatic due to minor dehydration of your teeth.  It is normal for the colour to tone down somewhat after treatment when your teeth rehydrate to a natural white tone.
  • Long term results vary from patient to patient.  This can depend on the original shade of your teeth and include habits such as smoking or drinking coloured beverages (red wine, coffee, tea, etc.)
  • “Top-up” treatments may be needed every 6-12 months to retain colour.  You can ask your dental professional about different “top-up” options.
  • To help prevent dulling and to boost your shade, patients can use their trays for 2 consecutive nights every 8 weeks if they wish.
  • Existing fillings, crowns, bonding, etc. will not whiten.  Therefore, these may need to be changed in order to match your new smile.
  • If your family or friends notice your new smile, let them know that whitening can help improve their smile too!

In House Bleaching

INFORMED CONSENT FOR POLA OFFICE + CHAIRSIDE TOOTH WHITENING

TREATMENT

Background: We provide this information to give you insight into Chairside professional tooth whitening.  Your cooperation and understanding of this material is necessary as we strive to achieve the best results for you.

Procedure:  Chairside professional tooth whitening is a procedure designed to lighten the color of your teeth using a hydrogen peroxide mixture.  It produces maximum whitening results in the shortest possible time with minimum sensitivity.  During the procedure, the whitening gel will be applied to your teeth for three (3) 8-minute sessions.  For the duration of the entire treatment, a plastic cheek retractor will be placed in your mouth to help keep it open and your gums will be covered with a barrier to ensure isolation from the hydrogen peroxide gel.  Before and after the treatment, the shade of your teeth will be assessed and recorded.

Risks: All forms of health treatment, including tooth whitening, have some risks and limitations.  Complications that can occur in professional tooth whitening are infrequent and are usually minor in nature.

Tooth Sensitivity: During the whitening process some patients may experience tooth sensitivity.  This is normal and generally mild if your teeth are not normally sensitive.

If your teeth are normally sensitive, please inform us before treatment.  Please let us know if you experience any discomfort during or after the procedure so we are able to minimize your discomfort. A mild analgesic will usually be effective in eliminating any discomfort.

Gum and soft tissue irritation: Whitening may cause inflammation of your gums, lips or cheek margins.  This is generally the result of the whitening gel coming into contact with these tissues.  Protective materials are placed in the mouth to prevent this, but despite our best efforts, it can still rarely occur. If any irritation does occur, it is generally short in duration and is very mild.  Rinsing with warm salt water can relieve it.

Existing restorations:  White fillings; porcelain or composite restorations, crowns or veneers may not whiten at all or evenly with your natural teeth during this procedure.

Please discuss this with your dentist prior to beginning treatment.

Treatment Responsibilities:  If you do not understand something communicated to you during consultation, or in any printed material given to you before or after the procedure, please feel free to ask.

Expectations: Significant whitening can be achieved in many cases, but there is no absolute way to predict how light your teeth will get.  Please understand that teeth with multiple colorations, bands, splotches or spots due to tetracycline staining or fluorosis do not whiten as well and may appear more spotted after treatment. These effects are generally short in duration. Chairside professional tooth whitening  is not recommended for pregnant or lactating women, children under 14 years of age or any persons having known peroxides allergies.

Alternate Treatment Options: While we feel that Chairside whitening is the fastest, most effective means of whitening your teeth, please take note that there are other options available to you, such as take home systems or Paint on whitening.  If you have questions regarding other treatment alternatives please ask the dentist.

Pola Office+ is a hydrogen peroxide based in-office tooth whitening system requiring minimal chair time. It is a neutral pH gel and contains desensitizers to maximize patient comfort. The dual barrel syringe system mixes as the gel is applied directly to the tooth.

Indications: 1. Whitening of discoloured vital teeth. 2. Whitening of discoloured non-vital teeth.

CONTRA-INDICATIONS:

  1. Do not use on pregnant or lactating women. 2. Do not use on children under 14 years of age. 3. Do not use the Gingival Barrier on any persons having known resin allergies. 4. Do not use Pola Office+ on any persons having known peroxides allergies. 5. Pola Office+ will not lighten any restorative materials. 6. Do not use on patients with extremely sensitive teeth.

Post-op Instructions:  Pola Office + Chairside teeth whitening

  • Follow instructions from your dental professional.
  • If you are a smoker, do not smoke for 48 hours.
  • Stay away from highly coloured foods (red sauce, blueberries, etc.) and beverages (coffee, tea, etc.) for 48 hours.
  • Mild sensitivity to hot or cold liquids may occur.  This usually passes within 1-2 days.
  • If sensitivity is severe or persists, contact your dental office.
  • If you experience gum sensitivity do not brush the afflicted area while brushing your teeth.
  • Immediate whitening results can be quite dramatic due to minor dehydration of your teeth.  It is normal for the colour to tone down somewhat after treatment when your teeth rehydrate to a natural white tone.
  • Long term results vary from patient to patient.  This can depend on the original shade of your teeth and include habits such as smoking or drinking coloured beverages (red wine, coffee, tea, etc.)
  • “Touch-up” treatments may be needed every 6-12 months to retain colour.  You can ask your dental professional about different “touch-up” options.
  • Existing fillings, crowns, bonding, etc. will not whiten.  Therefore, these may need to be changed in order to match your new smile.
  • If your family or friends notice your new smile, let them know that whitening can help improve their smile too!
Denture Advice

Even with well fitting dentures it is normal for your dentures to move a little when doing everyday activities such as eating and talking. A denture adhesive can provide comfort and help to give you the confidence you need to take on everyday life.

How to use adhesive:

  • Apply adhesive sparingly in short strips or a series of dots, not too close to denture edges.
  • If oozing occurs, use a little less product.

Removing your dentures:

  • Since dentures are fragile, it’s always best to take care when removing them.
  • Swish your mouth with warm water or a mouthwash, ideally an alcoholfree mouthwash.
  • To remove your top denture, place your thumb against your front teeth and press upward and outward toward your nose.
  • To remove your lower denture, slowly pull on your denture while applying a rocking motion.
  • Be sure to keep your dentures moist when you aren’t wearing them. Always store your dentures in a denture cleanser soaking solution or in water.

ALWAYS REMOVE YOUR DENTURE AT NIGHT

Taking care of your dentures

Taking good care of your dentures helps ensure that they look and feel their best.

Brush: Brush your dentures with a non-abrasive paste and a soft nylon denture brush, taking care to remove any remaining residue.

Soak: Dissolve a suitable cleanser in a glass of fresh water and soak your dentures for as long as indicated by the manufacturer. This will ensure a deep clean & kill any bacteria.

Rinse: Rinse your dentures under running cold tap water. Dry carefully.

Dentures

Dentures

Instructions for Alleviating a painful jaw joint
  1. Avoid Biting on front teeth
  2. Select soft food only. Do all Chewing on the painful side using back teeth only
  3. Do the following exercise for two 5 minute periods each day.
  4. Sit in a comfortable chair in front of a mirror with the back teeth resting together and relax. The tip of your tongue will be resting just behind the front of your teeth, now slowly roll the tongue backwards so you feel it running over the hard palate and then against the soft palate. Continue to push the tongue back as hard as you can, keeping it in contact with the soft palate and then slowly open you7r mouth. Check in the mirror that you are opening your mouth vertically and not deviating to one side. Most people find that the tip of the tongue is pulled away from the palate as the mouth is opened wide. Do not allow this to happen. Hold the position of conflict for five seconds and then repeat the exercise.

If your jaw clicks at any time during the exercise this will mean that you are not doing it properly and so start again from the beginning.

The purpose of the exercise is to pull the jaw backwards as hard as possible and relax the muscles which pull the jaw forward. This takes the strain off ligaments in the joints and allows them to heal. Initially, you may find that there is no improvement and the pain may seem worse. Do not get discouraged. After the first week, do the exercise for many short periods each day and a slow but gradual improvement will follow.

  1. Otherwise rest the joint, NO GUM CHEWING, I hour conversations etc.
  • Avoid wide yawning, clicking etc.
  • Learn to relax your muscle’s.
  • Do not clench or grind.
Sensitivity

Do you experience pain or tingling in your teeth, especially when eating sweet, hot or cold foods? Do brushing and flossing sometimes cause you to cringe? You may be suffering from teeth sensitivity — and you’re not alone: One in five adults suffers from sensitive teeth.

Pain from sensitive teeth usually comes and goes. If you have constant pain, it could be a sign of a more serious problem. Discuss your symptoms with your dentist to determine the cause and proper treatment of your condition.

What does teeth sensitivity mean for your teeth?

Teeth sensitivity can mean significant pain and it often impacts daily activities, such as eating, drinking, and brushing your teeth.

In healthy teeth, porous tissue called dentine is protected by your gums and by your teeth’s hard enamel outer layer. However, dentine can become exposed due to receding gums, fractured or chipped teeth or erosion. Microscopic holes in the dentine, called tubules, connect to the nerve, triggering pain when irritated by certain foods and beverages.

Causes of sensitive teeth:. Two recognized leading causes of teeth sensitivity are enamel loss and gum recession. For example:

Brushing too hard: Brushing too hard or using a hard-bristled toothbrush can cause gum recession over time

Acidic foods: Eating acidic foods and beverages on a regular basis can cause enamel to erode, increasing the likelihood of sensitivity

Help for a sensitive mouth

To reduce teeth sensitivity and enamel loss, your dental professional may recommend you use a soft-bristle toothbrush or a desensitizing toothpaste. 

Tooth Extractions Post Op

Your gums, and possibly your cheek and lip, may feel numb for several hours after the injection of local anaesthetic. During this period of numbness, avoid biting your lip or taking hot drinks as you may injure your lip without being aware of doing so.

After a tooth has been extracted, the socket will usually bleed for a short time. This bleeding stops because of the formation of a healthy clot of blood in the tooth socket. These clots are easily disturbed, and if this happens, more bleeding will occur. To avoid disturbance of the clot, please follow these following instructions.

  • After leaving the Dental Clinic do not rinse out your mouth for twelve hours unless you have been told otherwise by the dentist.
  • Do not disturb the clot in the socket with your tongue or your fingers.
  • For the rest of the day take only food which requires no chewing.
  • Do not chew on the affected side for at least three days.
  • Do not take alcoholic drinks or very hot drinks for the rest of the day.
  • Do not lie down. If you wish to rest do so in a sitting position.

If the tooth socket continues to bleed after you have left the Dental Clinic do not be alarmed as much of the liquid which appears to be blood is, in fact – saliva (water of the mouth).

Make a small pad from a clean handkerchief or gauze, place over the socket and close the teeth firmly on it.Keep up the pressure for15-30minutes.If the bleeding still does not stop,return to the Dental Clinic or phone the Dental Clinic. If after hours seek advice at the Accident & Emergency Department, Regional Hospital, Limerick, or your nearest hospital.

Dry Socket

Dry socket (alveolar osteitis) is one of the most common complications of tooth removal. It occurs when a blood clot fails to develop in the tooth socket, or if the blood clot becomes dislodged or disappears. This can happen three to five days after surgery.

The empty socket causes an ache or throbbing pain in your gum or jaw, which can be intense. There may be an unpleasant smell or taste from the empty tooth socket. If you look into the socket, you might be able to see exposed bone rather than a blood clot.

You are more at risk of developing dry socket if;

  • You don’t follow your dentists instructions after the extractions
  • You smoke
  • You’ve had the condition before
  • Your over 25 years old
  • The extraction was complicated
  • On the oral contraceptive pill

Contact your dentist or surgeon if you suspect you have dry socket. They can flush any debris out of the socket or cover it with a medicated dressing, which may be removed and replaced frequently until it heals. Sometimes an antibiotic and/or analgesic may be needed.

Dry socket can take several weeks to heal fully and occasionally sharp pieces of diseased bone may shed into the mouth during healing.

Know your Entitlments

 

KNOW YOUR ENTITLEMENTS!!

 

FREE Oral Cancer Screening with every check-up for ALL patient’s

 

FOR FULL MEDICAL CARD HOLDERS:

 

  • Annual check-up  (including Oral Cancer Screening)

  • 2 Free Fillings

  • All Extractions

  • Pregnant Women who are over 12 weeks are entitled to a free cleaning  (a letter from GP must be provided)

  • Dentures every 5 years subject to approval from the health board

  • Emergency treatment

  • Root Canal Treatment (subject to approval from the health board on front teeth only)

QUALIFIED PRSI PATIENTS:

 

FREE :         Annual check up (including Oral Cancer Screening)

Make an appointment

Contact us

Address: Newline, Charleville, Co. Cork

Tel: 063 81088

Email: info@nualacagneydental.ie

Opening Hours

Monday 9.00 - 5.30
Tuesday 9.00 - 6.00
Wednesday 9.00 - 8.00
Thursday 9.00 - 6.00
Friday 8.30 - 5.30
Saturday 9.00 - 12.00 (every 2nd Saturday)

"We believe in happy healthy smiles"


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